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grahamashouse:

The State of Grahama’s House by Graham McLeod

Many of you may have heard about the situation with Grahama’s House, but I wanted to make sure everyone got the real facts about what had/is happening with our beloved art car. I apologize in advance for the novella here.

Grahama’s House was a project that I devised about a year ago, the largest for me to date, in which our camp and community of friends came together to bring a new element to the playa in the form of an art car and performance art. We didn’t really know what it would turn into when we first embarked on this process and there was a lot of doubt as to whether it would even get finished, but we got it done down to the wire. I financed most all of it (with a significant contribution from Red Sonja and the camp) with the bulk of the work being done by Michael and myself. It took us months and thousands of dollars to build. As it progressed, more people came on board (Chase and Antje were early contributors) and eventually the entire camp came together to help with all the final touches that really make it what it is today. 

We never dreamed that it would make appearances at multiple events outside of Burning Man (Decompression, Treasure Island Music Festival, Opulent Temple Massive, even a music video). Even more surprising was how positively people responded to it as its identity became more and more pronounced with our friends developing their own granny identities themselves (Eamon’s Grahama being the most notable). The details inside/outside the house alone make it truly a remarkable work of art and I am very proud to have been a part of making it and sharing it with people.

A couple of weeks ago we noticed a transmission fluid leak, which we had to get resolved before our big party on Treasure Island with Opulent Temple. To sum up the story, we attempted a solution, but on the way to the party the engine caught fire twice and essentially disabled the engine. However, since we were on Caltrans territory they had to tow us for free and since the nearest place was treasure island we finagled a tow to the event. We rocked the event without a hitch and had a blast. It finally made it off the island yesterday and back to Nimby where it can live for about 6 months (I just paid the rent).

Woodshop (Jason) took a look at it for me to give me an idea of how salvageable of a situation this is. The good news is it can be fixed and live at Nimby for a while immobilized, the bad news is it will cost around $2000. It has always been a labor of love for me and I have dealt with all the trials that come with owning an art car from the get go. I have done a ridiculous amount of things (many times with help) to keep us from losing it altogether. It has also cost me an arm and a leg and I have basically been paying for it’s survival directly out of my pockets for the past year (minimally supplemented by a couple of events). I accepted that responsibility and because people loved it so much (and were not able to contribute financially), I was willing to sacrifice any extra money I had to keep it afloat. This whole experience has really broke my heart because every part of me wants to save her, but I know I can’t pay for it anymore. I feel like I am letting people down by not doing so, considering how much everyone has put into it and all the great experiences we’ve had with it.

If $2000 fell into my lap, I would eagerly put all the time and effort necessary to get her running and up to the playa again. However, I have resigned myself to the reality that Grahama’s House may have had her last run.This has been really hard for me, but the memories of Grahama’s will live on and I am really happy we all got to share it with all of you. I will keep you posted on the status. Thank you all so much.


GMC

#savegrahamashouse

grahamashouse:

i can dress myself is shooting our very first music video at the end of this month and we would love to include all of our funky friends in a fiendish granny party! 

If you are available and would like to participate, please join this event and we will message you with the details as the date approaches. 

Thank you all for being ever so lovely. :)

Image of Funky Ones Grahamas taken at Treasure Island Music Festival by Julian Cash Light Photography.

grahamashouse:

Bradbury & Bradbury creates highly detailed designs that not only have pleasant color schemes, but are also very intricate and lively. Once I stumbled upon this website, I knew I was going to use their designs. They are also located in the bay area!

This is the wallpaper we will be using for the interior of GMAH. It is actually going to be a combination of papers: frieze, wall border, ceiling borders, blocks, ceiling paper, and wallpaper. This will make a complex arrangement of patterns and dimension.  Although it will cost an arm and a leg, I believe this addition is an important component to the great GMAH that will really “sell” the concept and tie the whole project together.

grahamashouse:

Some big things have happened to GMH since we last checked in. All the rope lighting used for accenting arrived, we decided to ignore insurance (fingers crossed) and we got some building done on the damn MV!
Last weekend we worked from noon to 9p on both Saturday and Sunday. We made some really big strides. We purchased pretty much the last of the hardware and lumber we would need to finish the structure. We in turn put the plywood on top to complete the deck and then subsequently installed the linoleum flooring. We then built our railing and finally finalized our roof design. All huge steps. The rail is solid and could support Andre the goddamn giant. A linoleum floor with a rug on top will get slippery with playa dust, but it will be much easier to clean. Anyways, throwing a rug up there will fix any problems anyway. Structurally, all we need to do is build the roof, which has a folding design so it can fit through things like toll booths.
After numerous tickets and a very expensive tow, the truck has been moved to an empty lot in Pleasant Hill and is in the hands of Michael and Antje to look after. This is a bit of a burden for everyone else as our camp primarily lives in SF. But not having to move the thing twice a week and having it out of my hands is worth the trip out there. We plan on working both weekend days all day until the burn as we still have to build the rail, panel the outside, panel the inside, wire the lights, install wainscoating, glue on wallpaper, install the interior floor, build a secret cabinet, set up the sound system, build a ceiling, detail the interior/exterior, put on the siding, etc. There is a lot to do and not a lot of time to do it! Building resumes after 4th of July weekend. Till then!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Some big things have happened to GMH since we last checked in. All the rope lighting used for accenting arrived, we decided to ignore insurance (fingers crossed) and we got some building done on the damn MV!
Last weekend we worked from noon to 9p on both Saturday and Sunday. We made some really big strides. We purchased pretty much the last of the hardware and lumber we would need to finish the structure. We in turn put the plywood on top to complete the deck and then subsequently installed the linoleum flooring. We then built our railing and finally finalized our roof design. All huge steps. The rail is solid and could support Andre the goddamn giant. A linoleum floor with a rug on top will get slippery with playa dust, but it will be much easier to clean. Anyways, throwing a rug up there will fix any problems anyway. Structurally, all we need to do is build the roof, which has a folding design so it can fit through things like toll booths.
After numerous tickets and a very expensive tow, the truck has been moved to an empty lot in Pleasant Hill and is in the hands of Michael and Antje to look after. This is a bit of a burden for everyone else as our camp primarily lives in SF. But not having to move the thing twice a week and having it out of my hands is worth the trip out there. We plan on working both weekend days all day until the burn as we still have to build the rail, panel the outside, panel the inside, wire the lights, install wainscoating, glue on wallpaper, install the interior floor, build a secret cabinet, set up the sound system, build a ceiling, detail the interior/exterior, put on the siding, etc. There is a lot to do and not a lot of time to do it! Building resumes after 4th of July weekend. Till then!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Some big things have happened to GMH since we last checked in. All the rope lighting used for accenting arrived, we decided to ignore insurance (fingers crossed) and we got some building done on the damn MV!
Last weekend we worked from noon to 9p on both Saturday and Sunday. We made some really big strides. We purchased pretty much the last of the hardware and lumber we would need to finish the structure. We in turn put the plywood on top to complete the deck and then subsequently installed the linoleum flooring. We then built our railing and finally finalized our roof design. All huge steps. The rail is solid and could support Andre the goddamn giant. A linoleum floor with a rug on top will get slippery with playa dust, but it will be much easier to clean. Anyways, throwing a rug up there will fix any problems anyway. Structurally, all we need to do is build the roof, which has a folding design so it can fit through things like toll booths.
After numerous tickets and a very expensive tow, the truck has been moved to an empty lot in Pleasant Hill and is in the hands of Michael and Antje to look after. This is a bit of a burden for everyone else as our camp primarily lives in SF. But not having to move the thing twice a week and having it out of my hands is worth the trip out there. We plan on working both weekend days all day until the burn as we still have to build the rail, panel the outside, panel the inside, wire the lights, install wainscoating, glue on wallpaper, install the interior floor, build a secret cabinet, set up the sound system, build a ceiling, detail the interior/exterior, put on the siding, etc. There is a lot to do and not a lot of time to do it! Building resumes after 4th of July weekend. Till then!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Some big things have happened to GMH since we last checked in. All the rope lighting used for accenting arrived, we decided to ignore insurance (fingers crossed) and we got some building done on the damn MV!
Last weekend we worked from noon to 9p on both Saturday and Sunday. We made some really big strides. We purchased pretty much the last of the hardware and lumber we would need to finish the structure. We in turn put the plywood on top to complete the deck and then subsequently installed the linoleum flooring. We then built our railing and finally finalized our roof design. All huge steps. The rail is solid and could support Andre the goddamn giant. A linoleum floor with a rug on top will get slippery with playa dust, but it will be much easier to clean. Anyways, throwing a rug up there will fix any problems anyway. Structurally, all we need to do is build the roof, which has a folding design so it can fit through things like toll booths.
After numerous tickets and a very expensive tow, the truck has been moved to an empty lot in Pleasant Hill and is in the hands of Michael and Antje to look after. This is a bit of a burden for everyone else as our camp primarily lives in SF. But not having to move the thing twice a week and having it out of my hands is worth the trip out there. We plan on working both weekend days all day until the burn as we still have to build the rail, panel the outside, panel the inside, wire the lights, install wainscoating, glue on wallpaper, install the interior floor, build a secret cabinet, set up the sound system, build a ceiling, detail the interior/exterior, put on the siding, etc. There is a lot to do and not a lot of time to do it! Building resumes after 4th of July weekend. Till then!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Some big things have happened to GMH since we last checked in. All the rope lighting used for accenting arrived, we decided to ignore insurance (fingers crossed) and we got some building done on the damn MV!
Last weekend we worked from noon to 9p on both Saturday and Sunday. We made some really big strides. We purchased pretty much the last of the hardware and lumber we would need to finish the structure. We in turn put the plywood on top to complete the deck and then subsequently installed the linoleum flooring. We then built our railing and finally finalized our roof design. All huge steps. The rail is solid and could support Andre the goddamn giant. A linoleum floor with a rug on top will get slippery with playa dust, but it will be much easier to clean. Anyways, throwing a rug up there will fix any problems anyway. Structurally, all we need to do is build the roof, which has a folding design so it can fit through things like toll booths.
After numerous tickets and a very expensive tow, the truck has been moved to an empty lot in Pleasant Hill and is in the hands of Michael and Antje to look after. This is a bit of a burden for everyone else as our camp primarily lives in SF. But not having to move the thing twice a week and having it out of my hands is worth the trip out there. We plan on working both weekend days all day until the burn as we still have to build the rail, panel the outside, panel the inside, wire the lights, install wainscoating, glue on wallpaper, install the interior floor, build a secret cabinet, set up the sound system, build a ceiling, detail the interior/exterior, put on the siding, etc. There is a lot to do and not a lot of time to do it! Building resumes after 4th of July weekend. Till then!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Some big things have happened to GMH since we last checked in. All the rope lighting used for accenting arrived, we decided to ignore insurance (fingers crossed) and we got some building done on the damn MV!
Last weekend we worked from noon to 9p on both Saturday and Sunday. We made some really big strides. We purchased pretty much the last of the hardware and lumber we would need to finish the structure. We in turn put the plywood on top to complete the deck and then subsequently installed the linoleum flooring. We then built our railing and finally finalized our roof design. All huge steps. The rail is solid and could support Andre the goddamn giant. A linoleum floor with a rug on top will get slippery with playa dust, but it will be much easier to clean. Anyways, throwing a rug up there will fix any problems anyway. Structurally, all we need to do is build the roof, which has a folding design so it can fit through things like toll booths.
After numerous tickets and a very expensive tow, the truck has been moved to an empty lot in Pleasant Hill and is in the hands of Michael and Antje to look after. This is a bit of a burden for everyone else as our camp primarily lives in SF. But not having to move the thing twice a week and having it out of my hands is worth the trip out there. We plan on working both weekend days all day until the burn as we still have to build the rail, panel the outside, panel the inside, wire the lights, install wainscoating, glue on wallpaper, install the interior floor, build a secret cabinet, set up the sound system, build a ceiling, detail the interior/exterior, put on the siding, etc. There is a lot to do and not a lot of time to do it! Building resumes after 4th of July weekend. Till then!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Some big things have happened to GMH since we last checked in. All the rope lighting used for accenting arrived, we decided to ignore insurance (fingers crossed) and we got some building done on the damn MV!
Last weekend we worked from noon to 9p on both Saturday and Sunday. We made some really big strides. We purchased pretty much the last of the hardware and lumber we would need to finish the structure. We in turn put the plywood on top to complete the deck and then subsequently installed the linoleum flooring. We then built our railing and finally finalized our roof design. All huge steps. The rail is solid and could support Andre the goddamn giant. A linoleum floor with a rug on top will get slippery with playa dust, but it will be much easier to clean. Anyways, throwing a rug up there will fix any problems anyway. Structurally, all we need to do is build the roof, which has a folding design so it can fit through things like toll booths.
After numerous tickets and a very expensive tow, the truck has been moved to an empty lot in Pleasant Hill and is in the hands of Michael and Antje to look after. This is a bit of a burden for everyone else as our camp primarily lives in SF. But not having to move the thing twice a week and having it out of my hands is worth the trip out there. We plan on working both weekend days all day until the burn as we still have to build the rail, panel the outside, panel the inside, wire the lights, install wainscoating, glue on wallpaper, install the interior floor, build a secret cabinet, set up the sound system, build a ceiling, detail the interior/exterior, put on the siding, etc. There is a lot to do and not a lot of time to do it! Building resumes after 4th of July weekend. Till then!
Zoom Info

grahamashouse:

Some big things have happened to GMH since we last checked in. All the rope lighting used for accenting arrived, we decided to ignore insurance (fingers crossed) and we got some building done on the damn MV!

Last weekend we worked from noon to 9p on both Saturday and Sunday. We made some really big strides. We purchased pretty much the last of the hardware and lumber we would need to finish the structure. We in turn put the plywood on top to complete the deck and then subsequently installed the linoleum flooring. We then built our railing and finally finalized our roof design. All huge steps. The rail is solid and could support Andre the goddamn giant. A linoleum floor with a rug on top will get slippery with playa dust, but it will be much easier to clean. Anyways, throwing a rug up there will fix any problems anyway. Structurally, all we need to do is build the roof, which has a folding design so it can fit through things like toll booths.

After numerous tickets and a very expensive tow, the truck has been moved to an empty lot in Pleasant Hill and is in the hands of Michael and Antje to look after. This is a bit of a burden for everyone else as our camp primarily lives in SF. But not having to move the thing twice a week and having it out of my hands is worth the trip out there. We plan on working both weekend days all day until the burn as we still have to build the rail, panel the outside, panel the inside, wire the lights, install wainscoating, glue on wallpaper, install the interior floor, build a secret cabinet, set up the sound system, build a ceiling, detail the interior/exterior, put on the siding, etc. There is a lot to do and not a lot of time to do it! Building resumes after 4th of July weekend. Till then!

Insuring a box truck is proving harder than expected

grahamashouse:

I am at a crossroads for our beloved box-truck turned comfy abode. I had been putting off getting it insured for the past 4 months, but when I got a notice from the DMV to show proof of insurance or the registration would be revoked, I decided it was finally time to get off my ass and just pay up. Of course this wouldn’t be too big of a deal, I would call up AIS and they would find the cheapest insurance provider for me to fork over my cash to. I decided since the burn was coming up soon it was best to just get the insurance and get protected, yet little did I know how hefty of an ordeal I was about to leap into.

Our journey begins with a call to AIS 2 days before the proof of insurance is due (I am lazy like that). We go through the process and I am thrilled to learn that the insurance will only cost $239 for 6 months, all I need to provide is the VIN number of the truck. I quickly realize I do not have it as the title is in the truck itself, which I have also realized I forgot to move last week. Fortunately, I borrowed my girlfriend’s car to drive to work and used that during lunch to find and repark it. Once I get to where I remember parking it, it is nowhere to be found. I drive around all over the neighborhood, assuming my memory might be deceiving me. The more I look the more I panic, as I realized that it might’ve been towed. 2 calls and 4 hours later I have recovered my truck from the tow yard with $810.50 less dollars in my pocket.

I go back to the truck the next day and look on the dash to write down the VIN number since I forgot to bring the truck key with me (and forgot to to get the VIN after I got it back from the inpound). I call back AIS, hoping that we can be done with this ordeal only to find that the VIN does not show up. I start getting worried again and soon discover that the truck is in fact registered as a commercial vehicle, which cannot be changed. What was once $478 for a year of insurance has jumped to $2600!

I decided with few options available to do the following. I will risk not insuring it considering how little it is driven. The consequences being I get fined $200-$500 and have a possible tow. By all accounts this is much less than getting insured. We will soon move it to a lot in the east bay where it will be worked on and where Michael and Antje will watch it in the meantime. There’s a company I found that will insure vehicles temporarily and specifically for Burning Man, so hopefully that’ll work!

grahamashouse:

Doesn’t seem like much, but we have gotten a lot done in the past few weeks! The windows have been installed and weather-sealed, all the exterior framing has been finished, the blocking has been completed on the roof deck, the lighting system has been decided, and our remote controlled color changing lights have come in the mail.Taking a break this week as it is memorial day and everyone has various diversions to attend to. But in 2 weeks time we will begin building the roofing system and putting the exterior panels on. We will also begin installing the electrical system that will power all the lights.
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Doesn’t seem like much, but we have gotten a lot done in the past few weeks! The windows have been installed and weather-sealed, all the exterior framing has been finished, the blocking has been completed on the roof deck, the lighting system has been decided, and our remote controlled color changing lights have come in the mail.Taking a break this week as it is memorial day and everyone has various diversions to attend to. But in 2 weeks time we will begin building the roofing system and putting the exterior panels on. We will also begin installing the electrical system that will power all the lights.
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Doesn’t seem like much, but we have gotten a lot done in the past few weeks! The windows have been installed and weather-sealed, all the exterior framing has been finished, the blocking has been completed on the roof deck, the lighting system has been decided, and our remote controlled color changing lights have come in the mail.Taking a break this week as it is memorial day and everyone has various diversions to attend to. But in 2 weeks time we will begin building the roofing system and putting the exterior panels on. We will also begin installing the electrical system that will power all the lights.
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Doesn’t seem like much, but we have gotten a lot done in the past few weeks! The windows have been installed and weather-sealed, all the exterior framing has been finished, the blocking has been completed on the roof deck, the lighting system has been decided, and our remote controlled color changing lights have come in the mail.Taking a break this week as it is memorial day and everyone has various diversions to attend to. But in 2 weeks time we will begin building the roofing system and putting the exterior panels on. We will also begin installing the electrical system that will power all the lights.
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Doesn’t seem like much, but we have gotten a lot done in the past few weeks! The windows have been installed and weather-sealed, all the exterior framing has been finished, the blocking has been completed on the roof deck, the lighting system has been decided, and our remote controlled color changing lights have come in the mail.Taking a break this week as it is memorial day and everyone has various diversions to attend to. But in 2 weeks time we will begin building the roofing system and putting the exterior panels on. We will also begin installing the electrical system that will power all the lights.
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Doesn’t seem like much, but we have gotten a lot done in the past few weeks! The windows have been installed and weather-sealed, all the exterior framing has been finished, the blocking has been completed on the roof deck, the lighting system has been decided, and our remote controlled color changing lights have come in the mail.Taking a break this week as it is memorial day and everyone has various diversions to attend to. But in 2 weeks time we will begin building the roofing system and putting the exterior panels on. We will also begin installing the electrical system that will power all the lights.
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Doesn’t seem like much, but we have gotten a lot done in the past few weeks! The windows have been installed and weather-sealed, all the exterior framing has been finished, the blocking has been completed on the roof deck, the lighting system has been decided, and our remote controlled color changing lights have come in the mail.Taking a break this week as it is memorial day and everyone has various diversions to attend to. But in 2 weeks time we will begin building the roofing system and putting the exterior panels on. We will also begin installing the electrical system that will power all the lights.
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Doesn’t seem like much, but we have gotten a lot done in the past few weeks! The windows have been installed and weather-sealed, all the exterior framing has been finished, the blocking has been completed on the roof deck, the lighting system has been decided, and our remote controlled color changing lights have come in the mail.Taking a break this week as it is memorial day and everyone has various diversions to attend to. But in 2 weeks time we will begin building the roofing system and putting the exterior panels on. We will also begin installing the electrical system that will power all the lights.
Zoom Info

grahamashouse:

Doesn’t seem like much, but we have gotten a lot done in the past few weeks! The windows have been installed and weather-sealed, all the exterior framing has been finished, the blocking has been completed on the roof deck, the lighting system has been decided, and our remote controlled color changing lights have come in the mail.

Taking a break this week as it is memorial day and everyone has various diversions to attend to. But in 2 weeks time we will begin building the roofing system and putting the exterior panels on. We will also begin installing the electrical system that will power all the lights.

grahamashouse:

Missed a post last week, but have been busy on Gma’s House in the meantime. These last couple of weeks we have been re-evaluating how we want to build the outside, how to decorate the inside, how to light the thing, and exactly what our budget will be. Of course, the base design is the same as it always has been, but the details of how things will actually connect and work together is an evolving process.
Two weekends ago, Michael and I got the deck built. We first built the frame from 4x4’s connected with 2 6” lag bolts in each corner along with hangers. We installed our joist hangers in and then hoisted it up to the roof (weighed probably 150 lbs). Eamon helped us lift it up and worked our our theme camp proposal a bit as well and help get our wood ready. Once we had the deck on the roof we realized that we had somehow cut the frame too wide, so while up there we had to pull some cutty maneuvers to unscrew the bolts, detach the hangers and cut it to the proper length, all the while propping it up. Pretty tricky! Once we had those cut we attached our joists, but quickly realized that our long side of our frame was bowed. Michael had a genius idea of pulling the frame in using our extra lag bolts into the joists and then screwing the joists into the hangers. After we got the deck squared up on the roof, we screwed it in using galvanized screws through the roof into the joists. We then caulked everything to weatherseal it up.
This last weekend, we made some real progress, although to the naked eye, seemed minimal. Our original plan was to run 2x4s as columns on the outside of the truck and anchor them to columns on the inside of the truck, sandwiching the fiberglass wall. We would bolt in our deck to the outer columns for further support and then build our walls over this. Before we could put our columns on inside, we would need to remove the bumper rails along the walls, which were essentially aluminum channel with a vinyl covering attached to the wall using brackets. Once we removed the vinyl, we realized that we could re-use the channel as the interior column instead of 2x4s. This would not only save us space (effectively 3 inches), but more importantly save us wood. We also determined we could re-use the brackets to attach the interior walls to. Chase came for the day and put in all the blocking in the deck (the small pieces of wood between joists) and helped take out the brackets while Michael and I worked out our new plans, removed and replaced all the brackets and got necessary supplies.
The removal of the brackets wasn’t as easy as you’d think. Not only did you have to cut and remove the vinyl bumper from the channel, you then had to unscrew the channel from the brackets, then ratchet off the 4 hex screw from each bracket (about 30 brackets total), and because they had been glued to the fiberglass wall, chisel them off the wall. Also, because they were glued to the wall with an epoxy, some of the fiberglass stuck to the bracket, which meant that remaining fiberglass would need to be chiseled of each bracket so they would be smooth and level for reattaching.
The whole process took all day, but we now can actually put our columns in and perhaps even get the windows installed next week. Michael is a trooper and is making this possible, while help from other people like Margey, Eamon and CHase have all been really rocking! Stay tuned!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Missed a post last week, but have been busy on Gma’s House in the meantime. These last couple of weeks we have been re-evaluating how we want to build the outside, how to decorate the inside, how to light the thing, and exactly what our budget will be. Of course, the base design is the same as it always has been, but the details of how things will actually connect and work together is an evolving process.
Two weekends ago, Michael and I got the deck built. We first built the frame from 4x4’s connected with 2 6” lag bolts in each corner along with hangers. We installed our joist hangers in and then hoisted it up to the roof (weighed probably 150 lbs). Eamon helped us lift it up and worked our our theme camp proposal a bit as well and help get our wood ready. Once we had the deck on the roof we realized that we had somehow cut the frame too wide, so while up there we had to pull some cutty maneuvers to unscrew the bolts, detach the hangers and cut it to the proper length, all the while propping it up. Pretty tricky! Once we had those cut we attached our joists, but quickly realized that our long side of our frame was bowed. Michael had a genius idea of pulling the frame in using our extra lag bolts into the joists and then screwing the joists into the hangers. After we got the deck squared up on the roof, we screwed it in using galvanized screws through the roof into the joists. We then caulked everything to weatherseal it up.
This last weekend, we made some real progress, although to the naked eye, seemed minimal. Our original plan was to run 2x4s as columns on the outside of the truck and anchor them to columns on the inside of the truck, sandwiching the fiberglass wall. We would bolt in our deck to the outer columns for further support and then build our walls over this. Before we could put our columns on inside, we would need to remove the bumper rails along the walls, which were essentially aluminum channel with a vinyl covering attached to the wall using brackets. Once we removed the vinyl, we realized that we could re-use the channel as the interior column instead of 2x4s. This would not only save us space (effectively 3 inches), but more importantly save us wood. We also determined we could re-use the brackets to attach the interior walls to. Chase came for the day and put in all the blocking in the deck (the small pieces of wood between joists) and helped take out the brackets while Michael and I worked out our new plans, removed and replaced all the brackets and got necessary supplies.
The removal of the brackets wasn’t as easy as you’d think. Not only did you have to cut and remove the vinyl bumper from the channel, you then had to unscrew the channel from the brackets, then ratchet off the 4 hex screw from each bracket (about 30 brackets total), and because they had been glued to the fiberglass wall, chisel them off the wall. Also, because they were glued to the wall with an epoxy, some of the fiberglass stuck to the bracket, which meant that remaining fiberglass would need to be chiseled of each bracket so they would be smooth and level for reattaching.
The whole process took all day, but we now can actually put our columns in and perhaps even get the windows installed next week. Michael is a trooper and is making this possible, while help from other people like Margey, Eamon and CHase have all been really rocking! Stay tuned!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Missed a post last week, but have been busy on Gma’s House in the meantime. These last couple of weeks we have been re-evaluating how we want to build the outside, how to decorate the inside, how to light the thing, and exactly what our budget will be. Of course, the base design is the same as it always has been, but the details of how things will actually connect and work together is an evolving process.
Two weekends ago, Michael and I got the deck built. We first built the frame from 4x4’s connected with 2 6” lag bolts in each corner along with hangers. We installed our joist hangers in and then hoisted it up to the roof (weighed probably 150 lbs). Eamon helped us lift it up and worked our our theme camp proposal a bit as well and help get our wood ready. Once we had the deck on the roof we realized that we had somehow cut the frame too wide, so while up there we had to pull some cutty maneuvers to unscrew the bolts, detach the hangers and cut it to the proper length, all the while propping it up. Pretty tricky! Once we had those cut we attached our joists, but quickly realized that our long side of our frame was bowed. Michael had a genius idea of pulling the frame in using our extra lag bolts into the joists and then screwing the joists into the hangers. After we got the deck squared up on the roof, we screwed it in using galvanized screws through the roof into the joists. We then caulked everything to weatherseal it up.
This last weekend, we made some real progress, although to the naked eye, seemed minimal. Our original plan was to run 2x4s as columns on the outside of the truck and anchor them to columns on the inside of the truck, sandwiching the fiberglass wall. We would bolt in our deck to the outer columns for further support and then build our walls over this. Before we could put our columns on inside, we would need to remove the bumper rails along the walls, which were essentially aluminum channel with a vinyl covering attached to the wall using brackets. Once we removed the vinyl, we realized that we could re-use the channel as the interior column instead of 2x4s. This would not only save us space (effectively 3 inches), but more importantly save us wood. We also determined we could re-use the brackets to attach the interior walls to. Chase came for the day and put in all the blocking in the deck (the small pieces of wood between joists) and helped take out the brackets while Michael and I worked out our new plans, removed and replaced all the brackets and got necessary supplies.
The removal of the brackets wasn’t as easy as you’d think. Not only did you have to cut and remove the vinyl bumper from the channel, you then had to unscrew the channel from the brackets, then ratchet off the 4 hex screw from each bracket (about 30 brackets total), and because they had been glued to the fiberglass wall, chisel them off the wall. Also, because they were glued to the wall with an epoxy, some of the fiberglass stuck to the bracket, which meant that remaining fiberglass would need to be chiseled of each bracket so they would be smooth and level for reattaching.
The whole process took all day, but we now can actually put our columns in and perhaps even get the windows installed next week. Michael is a trooper and is making this possible, while help from other people like Margey, Eamon and CHase have all been really rocking! Stay tuned!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Missed a post last week, but have been busy on Gma’s House in the meantime. These last couple of weeks we have been re-evaluating how we want to build the outside, how to decorate the inside, how to light the thing, and exactly what our budget will be. Of course, the base design is the same as it always has been, but the details of how things will actually connect and work together is an evolving process.
Two weekends ago, Michael and I got the deck built. We first built the frame from 4x4’s connected with 2 6” lag bolts in each corner along with hangers. We installed our joist hangers in and then hoisted it up to the roof (weighed probably 150 lbs). Eamon helped us lift it up and worked our our theme camp proposal a bit as well and help get our wood ready. Once we had the deck on the roof we realized that we had somehow cut the frame too wide, so while up there we had to pull some cutty maneuvers to unscrew the bolts, detach the hangers and cut it to the proper length, all the while propping it up. Pretty tricky! Once we had those cut we attached our joists, but quickly realized that our long side of our frame was bowed. Michael had a genius idea of pulling the frame in using our extra lag bolts into the joists and then screwing the joists into the hangers. After we got the deck squared up on the roof, we screwed it in using galvanized screws through the roof into the joists. We then caulked everything to weatherseal it up.
This last weekend, we made some real progress, although to the naked eye, seemed minimal. Our original plan was to run 2x4s as columns on the outside of the truck and anchor them to columns on the inside of the truck, sandwiching the fiberglass wall. We would bolt in our deck to the outer columns for further support and then build our walls over this. Before we could put our columns on inside, we would need to remove the bumper rails along the walls, which were essentially aluminum channel with a vinyl covering attached to the wall using brackets. Once we removed the vinyl, we realized that we could re-use the channel as the interior column instead of 2x4s. This would not only save us space (effectively 3 inches), but more importantly save us wood. We also determined we could re-use the brackets to attach the interior walls to. Chase came for the day and put in all the blocking in the deck (the small pieces of wood between joists) and helped take out the brackets while Michael and I worked out our new plans, removed and replaced all the brackets and got necessary supplies.
The removal of the brackets wasn’t as easy as you’d think. Not only did you have to cut and remove the vinyl bumper from the channel, you then had to unscrew the channel from the brackets, then ratchet off the 4 hex screw from each bracket (about 30 brackets total), and because they had been glued to the fiberglass wall, chisel them off the wall. Also, because they were glued to the wall with an epoxy, some of the fiberglass stuck to the bracket, which meant that remaining fiberglass would need to be chiseled of each bracket so they would be smooth and level for reattaching.
The whole process took all day, but we now can actually put our columns in and perhaps even get the windows installed next week. Michael is a trooper and is making this possible, while help from other people like Margey, Eamon and CHase have all been really rocking! Stay tuned!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Missed a post last week, but have been busy on Gma’s House in the meantime. These last couple of weeks we have been re-evaluating how we want to build the outside, how to decorate the inside, how to light the thing, and exactly what our budget will be. Of course, the base design is the same as it always has been, but the details of how things will actually connect and work together is an evolving process.
Two weekends ago, Michael and I got the deck built. We first built the frame from 4x4’s connected with 2 6” lag bolts in each corner along with hangers. We installed our joist hangers in and then hoisted it up to the roof (weighed probably 150 lbs). Eamon helped us lift it up and worked our our theme camp proposal a bit as well and help get our wood ready. Once we had the deck on the roof we realized that we had somehow cut the frame too wide, so while up there we had to pull some cutty maneuvers to unscrew the bolts, detach the hangers and cut it to the proper length, all the while propping it up. Pretty tricky! Once we had those cut we attached our joists, but quickly realized that our long side of our frame was bowed. Michael had a genius idea of pulling the frame in using our extra lag bolts into the joists and then screwing the joists into the hangers. After we got the deck squared up on the roof, we screwed it in using galvanized screws through the roof into the joists. We then caulked everything to weatherseal it up.
This last weekend, we made some real progress, although to the naked eye, seemed minimal. Our original plan was to run 2x4s as columns on the outside of the truck and anchor them to columns on the inside of the truck, sandwiching the fiberglass wall. We would bolt in our deck to the outer columns for further support and then build our walls over this. Before we could put our columns on inside, we would need to remove the bumper rails along the walls, which were essentially aluminum channel with a vinyl covering attached to the wall using brackets. Once we removed the vinyl, we realized that we could re-use the channel as the interior column instead of 2x4s. This would not only save us space (effectively 3 inches), but more importantly save us wood. We also determined we could re-use the brackets to attach the interior walls to. Chase came for the day and put in all the blocking in the deck (the small pieces of wood between joists) and helped take out the brackets while Michael and I worked out our new plans, removed and replaced all the brackets and got necessary supplies.
The removal of the brackets wasn’t as easy as you’d think. Not only did you have to cut and remove the vinyl bumper from the channel, you then had to unscrew the channel from the brackets, then ratchet off the 4 hex screw from each bracket (about 30 brackets total), and because they had been glued to the fiberglass wall, chisel them off the wall. Also, because they were glued to the wall with an epoxy, some of the fiberglass stuck to the bracket, which meant that remaining fiberglass would need to be chiseled of each bracket so they would be smooth and level for reattaching.
The whole process took all day, but we now can actually put our columns in and perhaps even get the windows installed next week. Michael is a trooper and is making this possible, while help from other people like Margey, Eamon and CHase have all been really rocking! Stay tuned!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Missed a post last week, but have been busy on Gma’s House in the meantime. These last couple of weeks we have been re-evaluating how we want to build the outside, how to decorate the inside, how to light the thing, and exactly what our budget will be. Of course, the base design is the same as it always has been, but the details of how things will actually connect and work together is an evolving process.
Two weekends ago, Michael and I got the deck built. We first built the frame from 4x4’s connected with 2 6” lag bolts in each corner along with hangers. We installed our joist hangers in and then hoisted it up to the roof (weighed probably 150 lbs). Eamon helped us lift it up and worked our our theme camp proposal a bit as well and help get our wood ready. Once we had the deck on the roof we realized that we had somehow cut the frame too wide, so while up there we had to pull some cutty maneuvers to unscrew the bolts, detach the hangers and cut it to the proper length, all the while propping it up. Pretty tricky! Once we had those cut we attached our joists, but quickly realized that our long side of our frame was bowed. Michael had a genius idea of pulling the frame in using our extra lag bolts into the joists and then screwing the joists into the hangers. After we got the deck squared up on the roof, we screwed it in using galvanized screws through the roof into the joists. We then caulked everything to weatherseal it up.
This last weekend, we made some real progress, although to the naked eye, seemed minimal. Our original plan was to run 2x4s as columns on the outside of the truck and anchor them to columns on the inside of the truck, sandwiching the fiberglass wall. We would bolt in our deck to the outer columns for further support and then build our walls over this. Before we could put our columns on inside, we would need to remove the bumper rails along the walls, which were essentially aluminum channel with a vinyl covering attached to the wall using brackets. Once we removed the vinyl, we realized that we could re-use the channel as the interior column instead of 2x4s. This would not only save us space (effectively 3 inches), but more importantly save us wood. We also determined we could re-use the brackets to attach the interior walls to. Chase came for the day and put in all the blocking in the deck (the small pieces of wood between joists) and helped take out the brackets while Michael and I worked out our new plans, removed and replaced all the brackets and got necessary supplies.
The removal of the brackets wasn’t as easy as you’d think. Not only did you have to cut and remove the vinyl bumper from the channel, you then had to unscrew the channel from the brackets, then ratchet off the 4 hex screw from each bracket (about 30 brackets total), and because they had been glued to the fiberglass wall, chisel them off the wall. Also, because they were glued to the wall with an epoxy, some of the fiberglass stuck to the bracket, which meant that remaining fiberglass would need to be chiseled of each bracket so they would be smooth and level for reattaching.
The whole process took all day, but we now can actually put our columns in and perhaps even get the windows installed next week. Michael is a trooper and is making this possible, while help from other people like Margey, Eamon and CHase have all been really rocking! Stay tuned!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Missed a post last week, but have been busy on Gma’s House in the meantime. These last couple of weeks we have been re-evaluating how we want to build the outside, how to decorate the inside, how to light the thing, and exactly what our budget will be. Of course, the base design is the same as it always has been, but the details of how things will actually connect and work together is an evolving process.
Two weekends ago, Michael and I got the deck built. We first built the frame from 4x4’s connected with 2 6” lag bolts in each corner along with hangers. We installed our joist hangers in and then hoisted it up to the roof (weighed probably 150 lbs). Eamon helped us lift it up and worked our our theme camp proposal a bit as well and help get our wood ready. Once we had the deck on the roof we realized that we had somehow cut the frame too wide, so while up there we had to pull some cutty maneuvers to unscrew the bolts, detach the hangers and cut it to the proper length, all the while propping it up. Pretty tricky! Once we had those cut we attached our joists, but quickly realized that our long side of our frame was bowed. Michael had a genius idea of pulling the frame in using our extra lag bolts into the joists and then screwing the joists into the hangers. After we got the deck squared up on the roof, we screwed it in using galvanized screws through the roof into the joists. We then caulked everything to weatherseal it up.
This last weekend, we made some real progress, although to the naked eye, seemed minimal. Our original plan was to run 2x4s as columns on the outside of the truck and anchor them to columns on the inside of the truck, sandwiching the fiberglass wall. We would bolt in our deck to the outer columns for further support and then build our walls over this. Before we could put our columns on inside, we would need to remove the bumper rails along the walls, which were essentially aluminum channel with a vinyl covering attached to the wall using brackets. Once we removed the vinyl, we realized that we could re-use the channel as the interior column instead of 2x4s. This would not only save us space (effectively 3 inches), but more importantly save us wood. We also determined we could re-use the brackets to attach the interior walls to. Chase came for the day and put in all the blocking in the deck (the small pieces of wood between joists) and helped take out the brackets while Michael and I worked out our new plans, removed and replaced all the brackets and got necessary supplies.
The removal of the brackets wasn’t as easy as you’d think. Not only did you have to cut and remove the vinyl bumper from the channel, you then had to unscrew the channel from the brackets, then ratchet off the 4 hex screw from each bracket (about 30 brackets total), and because they had been glued to the fiberglass wall, chisel them off the wall. Also, because they were glued to the wall with an epoxy, some of the fiberglass stuck to the bracket, which meant that remaining fiberglass would need to be chiseled of each bracket so they would be smooth and level for reattaching.
The whole process took all day, but we now can actually put our columns in and perhaps even get the windows installed next week. Michael is a trooper and is making this possible, while help from other people like Margey, Eamon and CHase have all been really rocking! Stay tuned!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Missed a post last week, but have been busy on Gma’s House in the meantime. These last couple of weeks we have been re-evaluating how we want to build the outside, how to decorate the inside, how to light the thing, and exactly what our budget will be. Of course, the base design is the same as it always has been, but the details of how things will actually connect and work together is an evolving process.
Two weekends ago, Michael and I got the deck built. We first built the frame from 4x4’s connected with 2 6” lag bolts in each corner along with hangers. We installed our joist hangers in and then hoisted it up to the roof (weighed probably 150 lbs). Eamon helped us lift it up and worked our our theme camp proposal a bit as well and help get our wood ready. Once we had the deck on the roof we realized that we had somehow cut the frame too wide, so while up there we had to pull some cutty maneuvers to unscrew the bolts, detach the hangers and cut it to the proper length, all the while propping it up. Pretty tricky! Once we had those cut we attached our joists, but quickly realized that our long side of our frame was bowed. Michael had a genius idea of pulling the frame in using our extra lag bolts into the joists and then screwing the joists into the hangers. After we got the deck squared up on the roof, we screwed it in using galvanized screws through the roof into the joists. We then caulked everything to weatherseal it up.
This last weekend, we made some real progress, although to the naked eye, seemed minimal. Our original plan was to run 2x4s as columns on the outside of the truck and anchor them to columns on the inside of the truck, sandwiching the fiberglass wall. We would bolt in our deck to the outer columns for further support and then build our walls over this. Before we could put our columns on inside, we would need to remove the bumper rails along the walls, which were essentially aluminum channel with a vinyl covering attached to the wall using brackets. Once we removed the vinyl, we realized that we could re-use the channel as the interior column instead of 2x4s. This would not only save us space (effectively 3 inches), but more importantly save us wood. We also determined we could re-use the brackets to attach the interior walls to. Chase came for the day and put in all the blocking in the deck (the small pieces of wood between joists) and helped take out the brackets while Michael and I worked out our new plans, removed and replaced all the brackets and got necessary supplies.
The removal of the brackets wasn’t as easy as you’d think. Not only did you have to cut and remove the vinyl bumper from the channel, you then had to unscrew the channel from the brackets, then ratchet off the 4 hex screw from each bracket (about 30 brackets total), and because they had been glued to the fiberglass wall, chisel them off the wall. Also, because they were glued to the wall with an epoxy, some of the fiberglass stuck to the bracket, which meant that remaining fiberglass would need to be chiseled of each bracket so they would be smooth and level for reattaching.
The whole process took all day, but we now can actually put our columns in and perhaps even get the windows installed next week. Michael is a trooper and is making this possible, while help from other people like Margey, Eamon and CHase have all been really rocking! Stay tuned!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Missed a post last week, but have been busy on Gma’s House in the meantime. These last couple of weeks we have been re-evaluating how we want to build the outside, how to decorate the inside, how to light the thing, and exactly what our budget will be. Of course, the base design is the same as it always has been, but the details of how things will actually connect and work together is an evolving process.
Two weekends ago, Michael and I got the deck built. We first built the frame from 4x4’s connected with 2 6” lag bolts in each corner along with hangers. We installed our joist hangers in and then hoisted it up to the roof (weighed probably 150 lbs). Eamon helped us lift it up and worked our our theme camp proposal a bit as well and help get our wood ready. Once we had the deck on the roof we realized that we had somehow cut the frame too wide, so while up there we had to pull some cutty maneuvers to unscrew the bolts, detach the hangers and cut it to the proper length, all the while propping it up. Pretty tricky! Once we had those cut we attached our joists, but quickly realized that our long side of our frame was bowed. Michael had a genius idea of pulling the frame in using our extra lag bolts into the joists and then screwing the joists into the hangers. After we got the deck squared up on the roof, we screwed it in using galvanized screws through the roof into the joists. We then caulked everything to weatherseal it up.
This last weekend, we made some real progress, although to the naked eye, seemed minimal. Our original plan was to run 2x4s as columns on the outside of the truck and anchor them to columns on the inside of the truck, sandwiching the fiberglass wall. We would bolt in our deck to the outer columns for further support and then build our walls over this. Before we could put our columns on inside, we would need to remove the bumper rails along the walls, which were essentially aluminum channel with a vinyl covering attached to the wall using brackets. Once we removed the vinyl, we realized that we could re-use the channel as the interior column instead of 2x4s. This would not only save us space (effectively 3 inches), but more importantly save us wood. We also determined we could re-use the brackets to attach the interior walls to. Chase came for the day and put in all the blocking in the deck (the small pieces of wood between joists) and helped take out the brackets while Michael and I worked out our new plans, removed and replaced all the brackets and got necessary supplies.
The removal of the brackets wasn’t as easy as you’d think. Not only did you have to cut and remove the vinyl bumper from the channel, you then had to unscrew the channel from the brackets, then ratchet off the 4 hex screw from each bracket (about 30 brackets total), and because they had been glued to the fiberglass wall, chisel them off the wall. Also, because they were glued to the wall with an epoxy, some of the fiberglass stuck to the bracket, which meant that remaining fiberglass would need to be chiseled of each bracket so they would be smooth and level for reattaching.
The whole process took all day, but we now can actually put our columns in and perhaps even get the windows installed next week. Michael is a trooper and is making this possible, while help from other people like Margey, Eamon and CHase have all been really rocking! Stay tuned!
Zoom Info
grahamashouse:

Missed a post last week, but have been busy on Gma’s House in the meantime. These last couple of weeks we have been re-evaluating how we want to build the outside, how to decorate the inside, how to light the thing, and exactly what our budget will be. Of course, the base design is the same as it always has been, but the details of how things will actually connect and work together is an evolving process.
Two weekends ago, Michael and I got the deck built. We first built the frame from 4x4’s connected with 2 6” lag bolts in each corner along with hangers. We installed our joist hangers in and then hoisted it up to the roof (weighed probably 150 lbs). Eamon helped us lift it up and worked our our theme camp proposal a bit as well and help get our wood ready. Once we had the deck on the roof we realized that we had somehow cut the frame too wide, so while up there we had to pull some cutty maneuvers to unscrew the bolts, detach the hangers and cut it to the proper length, all the while propping it up. Pretty tricky! Once we had those cut we attached our joists, but quickly realized that our long side of our frame was bowed. Michael had a genius idea of pulling the frame in using our extra lag bolts into the joists and then screwing the joists into the hangers. After we got the deck squared up on the roof, we screwed it in using galvanized screws through the roof into the joists. We then caulked everything to weatherseal it up.
This last weekend, we made some real progress, although to the naked eye, seemed minimal. Our original plan was to run 2x4s as columns on the outside of the truck and anchor them to columns on the inside of the truck, sandwiching the fiberglass wall. We would bolt in our deck to the outer columns for further support and then build our walls over this. Before we could put our columns on inside, we would need to remove the bumper rails along the walls, which were essentially aluminum channel with a vinyl covering attached to the wall using brackets. Once we removed the vinyl, we realized that we could re-use the channel as the interior column instead of 2x4s. This would not only save us space (effectively 3 inches), but more importantly save us wood. We also determined we could re-use the brackets to attach the interior walls to. Chase came for the day and put in all the blocking in the deck (the small pieces of wood between joists) and helped take out the brackets while Michael and I worked out our new plans, removed and replaced all the brackets and got necessary supplies.
The removal of the brackets wasn’t as easy as you’d think. Not only did you have to cut and remove the vinyl bumper from the channel, you then had to unscrew the channel from the brackets, then ratchet off the 4 hex screw from each bracket (about 30 brackets total), and because they had been glued to the fiberglass wall, chisel them off the wall. Also, because they were glued to the wall with an epoxy, some of the fiberglass stuck to the bracket, which meant that remaining fiberglass would need to be chiseled of each bracket so they would be smooth and level for reattaching.
The whole process took all day, but we now can actually put our columns in and perhaps even get the windows installed next week. Michael is a trooper and is making this possible, while help from other people like Margey, Eamon and CHase have all been really rocking! Stay tuned!
Zoom Info

grahamashouse:

Missed a post last week, but have been busy on Gma’s House in the meantime. These last couple of weeks we have been re-evaluating how we want to build the outside, how to decorate the inside, how to light the thing, and exactly what our budget will be. Of course, the base design is the same as it always has been, but the details of how things will actually connect and work together is an evolving process.

Two weekends ago, Michael and I got the deck built. We first built the frame from 4x4’s connected with 2 6” lag bolts in each corner along with hangers. We installed our joist hangers in and then hoisted it up to the roof (weighed probably 150 lbs). Eamon helped us lift it up and worked our our theme camp proposal a bit as well and help get our wood ready. Once we had the deck on the roof we realized that we had somehow cut the frame too wide, so while up there we had to pull some cutty maneuvers to unscrew the bolts, detach the hangers and cut it to the proper length, all the while propping it up. Pretty tricky! Once we had those cut we attached our joists, but quickly realized that our long side of our frame was bowed. Michael had a genius idea of pulling the frame in using our extra lag bolts into the joists and then screwing the joists into the hangers. After we got the deck squared up on the roof, we screwed it in using galvanized screws through the roof into the joists. We then caulked everything to weatherseal it up.

This last weekend, we made some real progress, although to the naked eye, seemed minimal. Our original plan was to run 2x4s as columns on the outside of the truck and anchor them to columns on the inside of the truck, sandwiching the fiberglass wall. We would bolt in our deck to the outer columns for further support and then build our walls over this. Before we could put our columns on inside, we would need to remove the bumper rails along the walls, which were essentially aluminum channel with a vinyl covering attached to the wall using brackets. Once we removed the vinyl, we realized that we could re-use the channel as the interior column instead of 2x4s. This would not only save us space (effectively 3 inches), but more importantly save us wood. We also determined we could re-use the brackets to attach the interior walls to. Chase came for the day and put in all the blocking in the deck (the small pieces of wood between joists) and helped take out the brackets while Michael and I worked out our new plans, removed and replaced all the brackets and got necessary supplies.

The removal of the brackets wasn’t as easy as you’d think. Not only did you have to cut and remove the vinyl bumper from the channel, you then had to unscrew the channel from the brackets, then ratchet off the 4 hex screw from each bracket (about 30 brackets total), and because they had been glued to the fiberglass wall, chisel them off the wall. Also, because they were glued to the wall with an epoxy, some of the fiberglass stuck to the bracket, which meant that remaining fiberglass would need to be chiseled of each bracket so they would be smooth and level for reattaching.

The whole process took all day, but we now can actually put our columns in and perhaps even get the windows installed next week. Michael is a trooper and is making this possible, while help from other people like Margey, Eamon and CHase have all been really rocking! Stay tuned!

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